Retirement Planning

What Are Your Retirement Planning Options?

There are a variety of retirement planning options that can meet your needs. Your employer funds some; you fund some. Bear in mind that, in most cases, early withdrawals before age 59½ may be subject to a 10% federal income tax penalty. The latest date to begin required minimum distributions is usually April 1 of the year after you turn age 70½. In most cases, withdrawals are taxed as ordinary income. 

                       

 

WHAT IS AN IRA ROLLOVER?

If you leave a job or retire, you might want to transfer the money you've invested in one or more employer-sponsored retirement plans to an individual retirement account (IRA). An IRA rollover is an effective way to keep your money accumulating tax deferred.

Using an IRA rollover, you transfer your retirement savings to an account at a private institution of your choice, and you choose how you will invest the funds. To preserve the tax-deferred status of retirement savings, the funds must be deposited in the IRA within 60 days of withdrawal from an employer's plan. To avoid potential penalties and a 20% federal income tax withholding from your former employer, you should arrange for a direct, institution-to-institution transfer.

 

HOW SHOULD I MANAGE MY RETIREMENT PLAN?

 

The stock market has the potential to be extremely volatile. The return and principal value of stocks fluctuate with changes in market conditions. Shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Is it a safe place for your retirement money? Or should you shift more into a money market fund offering a stable but lower return?

And will the instability in the markets affect the investments that the sponsoring insurance company uses to fund its guaranteed interest contract?

If you're participating in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, you probably have the option of shifting the money in your plan from one fund to another. You can reallocate your retirement savings to reflect the changes you see in the marketplace. Let us send you a few guidelines to help you make this important decision.

                                                                   

WHAT IS A ROTH IRA?

Roth IRAs are tax-favored financial vehicles that enable investors to save money for retirement. They differ from traditional IRAs in that taxpayers cannot deduct contributions made to a Roth. However, qualified Roth IRA distributions in retirement are free of federal income tax and aren't included in a taxpayer's gross income. That can be advantageous, especially if the account owner is in a higher tax bracket in retirement or taxes are higher in the future.

A Roth IRA is subject to the same contribution limits as a traditional IRA, the maximum combined annual contribution an individual can make to traditional and Roth IRAs is $6,000 in 2019. Special “catch-up” contributions enable those nearing retirement (age 50 and older) to save at an accelerated rate by contributing $1,000 more than the regular annual limits.

Another way in which Roth IRAs can be advantageous is that investors can contribute to a Roth after age 70½ as long as they have earned income, and they don't have to begin taking mandatory distributions due to age, as they do with traditional IRAs; however, beneficiaries of Roth IRAs must take mandatory distributions.

                                                               

 

 Our team is here to help manage what you have worked your whole life to build and can walk with you, step-by-step, to achieve your financial goals.

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